Teacher Tools for Assessment Accommodations

Accommodations Considerations for Assessment and Instruction

 

Student Name

Age

Grade

Date

Student characteristics

Accommodations to Consider for Assessment and Instruction

Additional Accommodations to Consider for Instruction

Blind
Low Vision
Partial Sight

o    Large print

o    Magnification devices

o    Braille

o    Nemeth code

o    Tactile graphics

o    Human reader

o    Audio tape or CD

o    Screen reader

o    Express response to a scribe through speech

o    Type on or speak to word processor

o    Type on Brailler

o    Speak into tape recorder

o    Calculation devices (e.g., Talking calculator with enlarged keys, abacus)

o    Change location so student does not distract others

o    Change location to increase physical access

o    Change location to access special equipment

o    Extended time

o    Large print or Braille notes, outlines, and instructions

o    Descriptive video

o    Talking materials

o    Personal notetaker

Deaf/Hard of hearing

o    Sign language

o    Audio amplification devices

o    Screen reader

o    Type on or speak to word processor

o    Type on Brailler

o    Spelling and grammar assistive devices

o    Visual organizers

o    Graphic organizers

o    Change location to reduce distractions

o    Change location so student does not distract others

o    Change location to increase physical access (e.g., minimize background noise, face student when speaking, speak to student, not to interpreter, and increase wait time for interpreter to finish)

o    Visual cues

o    Written notes, outlines, and instructions

o    Audio amplification devices

o    Videotape and descriptive video

o    Talking materials

o    Provide advanced organizers and outlines of lectures for student to follow

o    Use gestures (e.g., point to materials)

o    Repeat questions and response from classmates

o    Copy notes from classmate

o    Use captioned versions of instructional films - include script when possible

o    Give interpreter instructional materials in advance

o    Learn some manual signs and teach them to hearing classmates

o    Use telecommunication device

Weak manual dexterity - difficulty or inability to write with pencil or type on standard keyboard

o    Express response to a scribe through speech, pointing or by using an assistive communication device

o    Type on or speak to word processor

o    Speak into tape recorder

o    Thick pencil or pencil grip

o    Written notes, outlines, and instructions

Reading disability - difficulty decoding printed text

o    Human reader

o    Audio tape or CD

o    Screen reader

o    Change location so student does not distract others

o    Written notes, outlines, and instructions

o    Videotape

Writing disability - difficulty with spelling

o    Express response to a scribe through speech

o    Type on or speak to word processor

o    Speak into tape recorder

o    Spelling and grammar assistive devies (e.g., electronic spelling device, spellcheck on computer)

o    Written notes, outlines, and instructions

Math disability

o    Calculation devices

o    Visual organizers

o    Graphic organizers

 

Physical disability

o    Express response to a scribe through speech, pointing, or by using an assistive communication device

o    Type on or speak to word processor

o    Speak into tape recorder

o    Write in test booklet instead of on answer sheet

o    Picture communication symbols

o    BIGmack - a single message communication device

o    Alternative keyboard and software

o    Change location to increase physical access

o    Change location to access special equipment

o    Extended time

o    Multiple or frequent breaks

o    Written notes, outlines, and instructions

Easily distracted, short attention span

o    Write in test booklet instead of on answer sheet

o    Monitor placement of student responses on answer sheet

o    Materials or devices used to solve or organize responses

o    Visual organizers

o    Graphic organizers

o    Short segment test booklets (if available)

o    Frequent breaks during testing

o    Use of organizers, highlighters, and templates to maintain focus

o    Seat in front of room

o    Have student repeat and explain directions to check for understanding

o    Use graph paper to keep numbers in proper columns

o    Schedule tests in the morning

o    Cue student to begin working and say on task

o    Change location to reduce distractions

o    Multiple or frequent breaks

o    Change testing schedule or order of subtests

o    Limit reading periods

o    Use books on tape or recorded books to help focus on text

o    Give short and simple directions with examples

o    Schedule activities requiring more seat time in the morning and more hands on and physical activities in the afternoon

o    Divide long term assignments

Communication disorder

o    Screen reader

o    Express response to a scribe by using an assistive communication device

o    Type on word processor

 

Format to remind test administrators about a student's accommodation needs on test day

This type of format puts the student in charge (building self advocacy skills) and sets the expectation that, with these accommodations, the student show what he/she knows on the test. Some accommodations (e.g., special test editions) need to be arranged long before test day, but should still be included on this list to make sure the student receives the correct test booklet.

I, (student name), need the following accomodations to take this test

(Student lists accommodations needed and hands this note to the test administrator)

If you need more information about these accommodations, you can talk to:

(Name of special education teacher, parent, principal, related service provider)

Thank you for helping me to do my best on this test!

Student signature
Date

 

Planning for Test Day

Here is a simple checklist to use when planning for the implementation of accommodations for individual students on test day.

Throughout the School Year

o    Accommodations are documented on student's IEP

o    Student uses accommodations regularly

o    A master accommodations plan/data base listing assessment acccommodation needs for all studetns tested is update regularly

In Preparation for Test Day

o    Special test editions are ordered for individual students based on information contained in master accommodations plan (e.g., large print, Braille, audio tape, short segment test editions).

o    Test administrators/proctors receive a list of accomodation needs for students they will supervise (list comes from master accommodations plan/data base).

o    Adult supervision is arranged and test administrators receive training for each student receiving accommodations in small group or individual settings (with substitutes available).

o    Trained readers, scribes, and sign language interpreters are arranged for individual students (with substitutes available).

o    Special equipment is arranged and checked for correct operation (e.g., word processor, tape recorder, calculator).
On Test Day

o    All students get needed accommodations.

o    Provision of accommodations is recorded by test administrator.

o    Substitutes are available as needed.

o    Plans are made to replace defective equipment.
Ater Test Day

o    Answer sheets are completed for students using special equipment.

o    All equipment is returned to appropriate locations.

o    Students who take make up tests receive needed accommodations.

o    Effectiveness of accommodations use is evaluated by test administrators and students, and plans are made for improvement.

Teacher Evaluation of Assessment Accommodations

Teacher Name ____________________________________________ Grade _______________

Test Subject ______________________________________________ Date _______________

Student name used accommodations on the recent state assessment. Please rate the effectiveness of these acommodations and comment about what you think might improve effectiveness. (1 = not effective, 2 = somewhat effective, 3 = very effective)

1. _____________________________________________________      1      2      3

How could the effectiveness of this accommodation be improved?

_________________________________________________________________

2. _____________________________________________________      1      2      3

How could the effectiveness of this accommodation be improved?

_________________________________________________________________

3. _____________________________________________________      1      2      3

How could the effectiveness of this accommodation be improved?

_________________________________________________________________

What are other accommodations that might increase access for this student?

 

Student Evaluation of Assessment Accommodations

(This form should be matched with teacher evaluation forms and result in a discussion with the student and teachers about how accommmodations use might be changed or improved.)

Teacher Name ____________________________________________ Grade _______________

Test Subject ______________________________________________ Date _______________

Student name used accommodations on the recent state assessment. Here is my rating of the effectiveness of these acommodations and comment about what I think might improve effectiveness. (1 = not effective, 2 = somewhat effective, 3 = very effective)

1. _____________________________________________________      1      2      3

I think the effectiveness of this accommodation could be improved by...

_________________________________________________________________

2. _____________________________________________________      1      2      3

I think the effectiveness of this accommodation could be improved by...

_________________________________________________________________

3. _____________________________________________________      1      2      3

I think the effectiveness of this accommodation could be improved by...

_________________________________________________________________

Other accommodations that might work for me include...

 

 

Accommodations Journal: Keeping Track of What Works

One way to keep track of what accomodations work for a student is to support the student in keeping an "accommodations journal". The journal lets the student be "in charge" and could be kept up-to-date through regular consulation with a special education teacher or other staff member. Just think of how much easier it would be for an IEP team to decide which accommodations to document on a student's IEP if the student came to the IEP meeting with a journal (with weekly or biweekly entries) documenting all these things:

  • Accommodations used,
  • Quality of classroom work and test results when accommodations are used,
  • Student's perception of how well the accommodation "worked",
  • What happens when the student doesn't use the accommodation,
  • What combinations of accommodations work better,
  • Challenges student is having in gaining access to the accommodation, and
  • Perceptions of teachers, therapists, and parents.

 


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